US Brand Name

  1. Metozolv ODT
  2. Reglan

Descriptions

Metoclopramide is used to treat the symptoms of a certain type of stomach problem called gastroparesis in patients with diabetes. It works by increasing the movements or contractions of the stomach and intestines. It relieves symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, heartburn, a feeling of fullness after meals, and loss of appetite. Metoclopramide is also used to treat heartburn for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is esophageal irritation from the backward flow of gastric acid into the esophagus.
This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although these uses are not included in product labeling, metoclopramide is used in certain patients with the following medical conditions:
• Failure of the stomach to empty its contents.
• Nausea and vomiting caused by other medicines.
• Persistent hiccups.
• Prevention of aspirating fluid into the lungs during surgery.
• Vascular headaches.
This product is available in the following dosage forms:
• Syrup
• Tablet, Disintegrating
• Tablet
• Solution

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies
Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric
Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of metoclopramide in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric
Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metoclopramide in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have side effects such as tardive dyskinesia, confusion, or drowsiness, and age-related kidney problems, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving metoclopramide.

Pregnancy
Information about this metoclopramide-oral-route
Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breastfeeding
There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions
Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.
Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.
• Amitriptyline
• Amoxapine
• Aripiprazole
• Asenapine
• Bupropion
• Chlorpromazine
• Citalopram
• Clomipramine
• Clozapine
• Desipramine
• Desvenlafaxine
• Doxepin
• Duloxetine
• Escitalopram
• Fluoxetine
• Fluphenazine
• Fluvoxamine
• Haloperidol
• Iloperidone
• Imipramine
• Loxapine
• Lurasidone
• Maprotiline
• Mesoridazine
• Mirtazapine
• Molindone
• Nefazodone
• Nortriptyline
• Olanzapine
• Paliperidone
• Paroxetine
• Perphenazine
• Pimozide
• Prochlorperazine
• Promazine
• Promethazine
• Protriptyline
• Quetiapine
• Risperidone
• Rivastigmine
• Thioridazine
• Thiothixene
• Trazodone
• Trifluoperazine
• Trimethobenzamide
• Venlafaxine
• Ziprasidone

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.
• Bromocriptine
• Isocarboxazid
• Linezolid
• Milnacipran
• Phenelzine
• Rasagiline
• Selegiline
• Tramadol
• Tranylcypromine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.
• Cyclosporine
• Didanosine
• Digoxin
• Levodopa
• Mivacurium
• Posaconazole
• Sertraline
• Succinylcholine
• Tacrolimus
• Thiopental

Other Interactions
Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.
Other Medical Problems
The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:
• Abdominal or stomach bleeding or
• Intestinal blockage or perforation (hole in the intestine) or
• Pheochromocytoma (adrenal gland tumor) or
• Seizures or epilepsy—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
• Asthma or
• Cirrhosis (liver disease) or
• Congestive heart failure or
• Diabetes or
• Heart rhythm problems (e.g., ventricular arrhythmia) or
• Hypertension (high blood pressure) or
• Mental depression, or history of or
• Neuroleptic malignant syndrome, history of or
• Parkinson’s disease, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
• Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (an enzyme problem) or
• Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) cytochrome reductase deficiency (an enzyme problem)—May increase the risk for side effects affecting the blood.
• Kidney disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Take this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.
This medicine should come with a Medication Guide. It is very important that you read and understand this information. Be sure to ask your doctor about anything you do not understand.

Take this medicine on an empty stomach, at least 30 minutes before meals and at bedtime. If you forget and take it with food, do not repeat the dose.
If you are using the disintegrating tablet, make sure your hands are dry before you handle the tablet. Do not open the blister pack that contains the tablet until you are ready to take it. Remove the tablet from the blister pack by peeling back the foil, then taking the tablet out. Do not push the tablet through the foil. Place the tablet on your tongue. It should melt quickly. If the tablet breaks or crumbles before you take it, throw it away and get a new tablet from the blister pack.

Dosing
The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.
• For oral dosage forms (solution or tablets):

For diabetic gastroparesis:
Adults and teenagers—10 milligrams (mg) 30 minutes before symptoms are likely to begin or before each meal and at bedtime. The dose may be taken up to four times per day.
Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
For gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD):
Adults and teenagers—10 to 15 milligrams (mg) 30 minutes before symptoms are likely to begin or before each meal and at bedtime. The dose may be taken up to four times per day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed.
Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose
If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage
Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.
Keep out of the reach of children.
Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.
Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly.
This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for hay fever or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; medicine for seizures or barbiturates; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before taking any of these medicines while you are using metoclopramide.

This medicine may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or not alert.
This medicine may cause tardive dyskinesia (a movement disorder). Stop using this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms while taking this medicine: lip smacking or puckering, puffing of the cheeks, rapid or worm-like movements of the tongue, uncontrolled chewing movements, or uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs. The risk of tardive dyskinesia is higher if you take this medicine longer than 12 weeks. Treatment for longer than 12 weeks should be avoided in all but rare cases.
Tell your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms while you are using this medicine: inability to move the eyes; increased blinking or spasms of the eyelid; trouble with breathing, speaking, or swallowing; uncontrolled tongue movements; uncontrolled twisting movements of the neck, trunk, arms, or legs; unusual facial expressions; or weakness of the arms and legs.

Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms while using this medicine: convulsions (seizures); difficulty with breathing; a fast heartbeat; a high fever; high or low blood pressure; increased sweating; loss of bladder control; severe muscle stiffness; unusually pale skin; or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).
You may have dizziness, headaches, or nervousness when you stop taking this medicine. These side effects should go away. Check with your doctor if any of the side effects continue or if you have any questions about them.
Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.
Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:
Rare
• Abdominal or stomach pain or tenderness
• chills
• clay colored stools
• convulsions (seizures)
• dark urine
• difficulty with breathing
• difficulty with speaking or swallowing
• dizziness or fainting
• fast or irregular heartbeat
• fever
• general feeling of tiredness or weakness
• headache (severe or continuing)
• inability to move the eyes
• increase in blood pressure
• increased sweating
• itching
• lip smacking or puckering
• loss of appetite
• loss of balance control
• loss of bladder control
• mask-like face
• muscle spasms of the face, neck, and back
• nausea and vomiting
• puffing of the cheeks
• rapid or worm-like movements of the tongue
• shuffling walk
• skin rash
• sore throat
• stiffness of the arms or legs
• swelling of the feet or lower legs
• tic-like or twitching movements
• trembling and shaking of the hands and fingers
• twisting movements of the body
• uncontrolled chewing movements
• uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs
• unusually pale skin
• weakness of the arms and legs
• yellow eyes or skin
Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:
Symptoms of overdose
• Confusion
• drowsiness (severe)
Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:
More common
• Diarrhea
• drowsiness
• restlessness
Less common or rare
• Breast tenderness and swelling
• changes in menstruation
• constipation
• decreased interest in sexual intercourse
• inability to have or keep an erection
• increased flow of breast milk
• increased need to urinate
• loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance
• mental depression
• passing urine more often
• skin rash
• trouble sleeping
• unusual dryness of the mouth
• unusual irritability
Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.
Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Metronidazole (Oral Route)
Descriptions
Drug information provided by: Micromedex

Metronidazole is used to treat bacterial infections in different areas of the body. The extended-release tablets are used to treat women with vaginal infections (bacterial vaginosis).
Metronidazole belongs to the class of medicines known as antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria or preventing their growth. However, this medicine will not work for colds, flu, or other virus infections.
This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.
Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although these uses are not included in product labeling, metronidazole is used in certain patients with the following medical conditions:
• Clostridium difficile diarrhea or colitis (antibiotic-associated colitis).
• Crohn’s disease (inflammatory bowel disease).
• Gastritis or stomach ulcers due to Helicobacter pylori.
• Giardiasis (parasite infection in the intestines).
This product is available in the following dosage forms:
• Tablet, Extended Release
• Capsule
• Tablet
• Suspension

Before Using
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies
Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric
Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of metronidazole capsules and tablets in the pediatric population, except for the treatment of amebiasis. Safety and efficacy have not been established.
Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metronidazole extended-release tablets to treat bacterial vaginosis in teenage females, but should not be used before the start of menstruation.

Geriatric
Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metronidazole in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have unwanted effects and age-related liver problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving metronidazole.

Pregnancy
Information about this metronidazole-oral-route
Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breastfeeding
There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions
Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.
Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.
• Amprenavir
• Disulfiram
Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.
• Amiodarone
• Busulfan
• Fluorouracil
• Mycophenolate Mofetil
• Tegafur
• Warfarin
Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.
• Carbamazepine
• Cholestyramine
• Cyclosporine
• Lithium
• Milk Thistle
• Tacrolimus
Other Interactions
Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.
Using this medicine with any of the following is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication, change some of the other medicines you take, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.
• Ethanol
Other Medical Problems
The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:
• Blood or bone marrow problems, or history of or
• Brain disease (eg, aseptic meningitis, encephalopathy) or
• Leukopenia (low white blood cells), history of or
• Optic neuropathy (eye disease with vision changes), history of or
• Oral thrush (Candida infection) or
• Peripheral neuropathy (nerve disease with pain, numbness, or tingling), history of or
• Seizures, history of or
• Vaginal yeast infection (Candida infection)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
• Kidney disease, end-stage or
• Liver disease, severe—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
Take this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.
The tablets or capsules can be taken with or without food. If the medicine upsets your stomach, it is best to take it with a meal or snack.
The extended–release tablet must be taken without food, 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Swallow the extended-release tablet whole. Do not break, crush, or chew it.
To help clear up your infection completely, keep using this medicine for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to feel better after a few days. If you stop using this medicine too soon, your infection may return.

This medicine works best when there is a constant amount in the blood. To help keep the amount constant, do not miss any doses. Also, it is best to take the doses at evenly spaced times during the day. If you need help planning the best times to take your medicine, check with your doctor.

Dosing
The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.
• For oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
For amebiasis infections:
Adults and teenagers—500 or 750 milligrams (mg) three times a day for 5 to 10 days.
Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 35 to 50 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight per day, divided and given in three doses, for 10 days.

For bacterial infections:
Adults and teenagers—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 7.5 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 6 hours for 7 to 10 days. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 4000 mg per day.
Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For trichomoniasis infections:
Adults and teenagers—The tablet can be given 3 different ways: as a single dose of 2 grams, as 1 gram two times a day for 1 day, or as 250 milligrams (mg) 3 times a day for 7 days. The capsule dose is 375 mg two times a day for 7 days.
Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
• For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets):
For bacterial vaginosis:
Adults and teenagers—750 milligrams (mg) once a day for 7 days.
Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose
If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage
Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.
Keep out of the reach of children.
Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.
Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
It is important that your doctor check your progress after you finish taking this medicine. This is to make sure that the infection is cleared up. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

If your symptoms do not improve within a few days after you start this medicine or if they become worse, check with your doctor.
Do not take metronidazole if you have taken disulfiram (Antabuse®) within the last 2 weeks. Using these medicines together may cause serious unwanted effects.

Drinking alcoholic beverages while using this medicine may cause stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, headache, or flushing or redness of the face. Other alcohol-containing preparations (eg, elixirs, cough syrups, tonics) may also cause problems. These problems may last for at least one day after you stop using metronidazole. This medicine may also cause alcoholic beverages to taste different. You should not drink alcoholic beverages or take other alcohol-containing preparations while you are using this medicine and for at least 3 days after stopping it.

If you have trichomoniasis: Using this medicine while you are pregnant (especially during the first 3 months of pregnancy) can harm your unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control to keep from getting pregnant. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.

If you are using this medicine for trichomoniasis (an infection of the sex organs in men or women), your doctor may want to treat your sexual partner at the same time you are being treated, even if he or she has no symptoms. Also, it may be desirable to use a condom (rubber) during sexual intercourse. These measures will help to keep you from getting the infection back again from your partner. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Check with your doctor right away if you have burning, numbness, tingling, or painful sensations in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. These could be symptoms of a condition called peripheral neuropathy.

Check with your doctor right away if you have dizziness, problems with muscle control or coordination, shakiness or an unsteady walk, slurred speech, or trouble speaking. These may be symptoms of a serious brain condition called encephalopathy.
Call your doctor right away if you have confusion, drowsiness, fever, a general feeling of illness, a headache, loss of appetite, nausea, a stiff neck or back, or vomiting. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called aseptic meningitis.

Metronidazole may cause dry mouth, an unpleasant or sharp metallic taste, and a change in taste sensation. For temporary relief of dry mouth, use sugarless candy or gum, melt bits of ice in your mouth, or use a saliva substitute. If your mouth continues to feel dry for more than 2 weeks, check with your medical doctor or dentist. Continuing dryness of the mouth may increase the chance of dental disease, including tooth decay, gum disease, and fungus infections.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Side Effects
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.
Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:
More common
• Agitation
• back pain
• blindness
• blurred vision
• burning, numbness, tingling, or painful sensations in the hands or feet
• changes in speech patterns
• confusion
• convulsions
• decreased vision
• depression
• dizziness
• drowsiness
• eye pain
• fever
• hallucinations
• headache
• irritability
• lack of coordination
• nausea
• seizures
• shakiness and unsteady walk
• slurred speech
• stiff neck or back
• trouble speaking
• unsteadiness, trembling, or other problems with muscle control or coordination
• unusual tiredness or weakness
• vomiting
• weakness in the arms, hands, legs, or feet
Less common
• Black, tarry stools
• blood in the urine or stools
• body aches or pain
• chills
• clumsiness or unsteadiness
• difficulty with breathing
• ear congestion
• feeling of pelvic pressure
• frequent or painful urination
• loss of voice
• nasal congestion
• pinpoint red spots on the skin
• runny nose
• skin rash, hives, redness, or itching
• sneezing
• stomach and back pain (severe)
• unusual bleeding or bruising
• vaginal irritation, discharge, or dryness not present before taking the medicine
Rare
• Bleeding gums
• bloating
• chest pain
• constipation
• cough
• dark-colored urine
• fast heartbeat
• indigestion
• loss of appetite
• painful or difficult urination
• pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
• sore throat
• sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
• swollen glands
• yellow eyes or skin
Incidence not known
• Blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
• bloody or cloudy urine
• burning while urinating
• continuing diarrhea
• continuing stomach pain
• diarrhea
• feeling of warmth
• increased volume of pale, dilute urine
• joint or muscle pain
• loss of bladder control
• red skin lesions, often with a purple center
• red, irritated eyes
• redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
• redness of the skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:
More common
• Abdominal or stomach cramps
• dizziness or lightheadedness
• feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
• heartburn
• sensation of spinning
• trouble sleeping
• weight loss
Less common or rare
• Change in taste sensation
• congestion
• dry mouth
• pain or tenderness around the eyes and cheekbones
• tender, swollen glands in the neck
• trouble with swallowing
• unpleasant or sharp metallic taste
• voice changes
Incidence not known
• Decreased interest in sexual intercourse
• inability to have or keep an erection
• loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance
• painful sexual intercourse
Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.
Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.


Descriptions
Drug information provided by: Micromedex

Miconazole belongs to the group of medicines called antifungals. Topical miconazole is used to treat some types of fungus infections.
Some of these preparations may be available without a prescription.
This product is available in the following dosage forms:
• Lotion
• Tablet, Effervescent
• Cream
• Ointment
• Powder
• Kit
• Gel/Jelly
• Tincture
• Spray

Before Using
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies
Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric
Although there is no specific information comparing use of topical miconazole in children with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than it does in adults.

Geriatric
Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing use of topical miconazole in the elderly with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Drug Interactions
Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.
Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.
• Warfarin

Other Interactions
Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Proper Use
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
Keep this medicine away from the eyes.
Apply enough miconazole to cover the affected area, and rub in gently.
To use the aerosol powder form of miconazole:
• Shake well before using.
• From a distance of 6 to 10 inches, spray the powder on the affected areas. If it is used on the feet, spray it between the toes, on the feet, and in the socks and shoes.
• Do not inhale the powder.
• Do not use near heat, near open flame, or while smoking.
To use the aerosol solution form of miconazole:
• Shake well before using.
• From a distance of 4 to 6 inches, spray the solution on the affected areas. If it is used on the feet, spray it between the toes and on the feet.
• Do not inhale the vapors from the spray.
• Do not use near heat, near open flame, or while smoking.
To use the powder form of miconazole:
• If the powder is used on the feet, sprinkle it between the toes, on the feet, and in the socks and shoes.

When miconazole is used to treat certain types of fungus infections of the skin, an occlusive dressing (airtight covering, such as kitchen plastic wrap) should not be applied over this medicine. To do so may cause irritation of the skin. Do not apply an occlusive dressing over this medicine unless you have been directed to do so by your doctor.
To help clear up your infection completely, keep using this medicine for the full time of treatment, even if your condition has improved. Do not miss any doses.

Dosing
The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.
• For aerosol powder, aerosol solution, cream , and powder dosage forms:
For fungus infections:
Adults and children—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin two times a day, morning and evening.
• For cream and lotion dosage forms:
For sun fungus:
Adults and children—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin once a day.
Missed Dose
If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage
Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.
Store the canister at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. Do not freeze. Do not keep this medicine inside a car where it could be exposed to extreme heat or cold. Do not poke holes in the canister or throw it into a fire, even if the canister is empty.
Keep out of the reach of children.
Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
If your skin problem does not improve within 4 weeks, or if it becomes worse, check with your health care professional.

Side Effects
Drug information provided by: Micromedex
Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.
Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:
Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.
Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

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